L'ITALIA RIPARTE SOLO ATTIRANDO I RICCHI E I BRAVI E CACCIANDO I POVERI E INCAPACI


DAL FINANCIAL TIME: I ROBOT DELLE BANCHE FARANNO SERVIZI DI INVESTIMENTO PER GLI SFIGATI CON POCHI RISPARMI (cosi' gli ciuliamo anche quelli)

 
che un promotore medio sia battibile da un robot...NULLA DI PIU' FACILE..ma che le persone smart ..conioscendo i robot , li possino fregare e' ancora piu' VERO.
le macchine hanno fottuto miliardi di euro e di dollari con il trading on line...ma solo perche' usano algoritmi di calcolo e velocita' non replicabili dai mortali.Ma che arrivino dei robot capaci di fare consulenza finanziaria  meglio di uomini smart ....ci sara' da ridere..
sicuramente si andra' verso la eliminazione dell'80% dei promotori finanziari e private banker..in quanto incapaci di reggere gli input di una macchina..ma ci sara' un 20% di banker e consulenti che faranno i soldi conoscendo gli algoritmi stupidi inseriti in un robot..
WMO con il gruppo FINTECHLAB sta lavorando per avere a disposizione gli algoritmi quatitativi dei robot e poterli aggirare UMANAMENTE..intanto lasciamo i robot ai primi successi....funziona come i TRADING SYSTEM..il primo anno funzionano e poi..fanno disastri..
STESSA COSA PER I ROBOT..STESSA COSA..
The UK’s biggest banks are planning to launch “robo-advisers” in a bold move to provide investment advice with a digital twist to thousands of consumers, only a few years after they were forced out of the market for mis-selling. 
DAL FINANCIAL TIME: I ROBOT FARANNO SERVIZI DI INVESTIMENTO PER GLI SFIGATI CON POCHI RISPARMI (cosi' gli ciuliamo anche quelli)
Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds and Santander UK are developing special online sites to offer investment advice for all their customers, with one so-called robo-adviser expected to launch in the next two months, according to people familiar with the situation.
Digital robo-advice is a lower-cost way of providing investment expertise to thousands of people with small savings pots who have been priced out of the advice market in the past few years.
Robo-advice would allow customers to go online and answer a number of questions about their financial circumstances. The bank would suggest how much money to invest into certain funds, and could then transact on a customer’s behalf in return for a fee. (continua a leggere)

The move by the high street banks is a defensive response to the rapid growth of a few specialist robo-advice providers, such as Nutmeg in the UK and Betterment in the US.
But the banks’ retreat from the market three years ago because of fines and regulation left thousands of people unsure of how to invest, sparking concerns over the long-term savings and retirement prospects for the UK population. Mark Garnier, a Conservative MP, told the Financial Times: “People do recognise the advice gap is a problem, but because of the way the market is structured, it’s expensive to do it.
“Robo-advice is an answer, but it’s not the solution. What it’s not tackling is the urgent need for people to take control of financial planning as soon as they start earning. This is something hands-on financial advice addresses.”
Most of the large banks in the UK stopped giving investment advice to many consumers following a major piece of regulation in 2013, called the retail distribution review.
The rules, imposed by the City watchdog to clarify the charges between product sales and advice, made it uneconomical for banks to advise customers with small amounts to invest.
A number of lenders also came under regulatory scrutiny for mis-selling investment products — and were dealt hefty fines as a result. Lloyds, for example, was hit with a £28m penalty in 2013 for the way its staff were incentivised to sell retail products.
However, a top banking executive told the FT that it was “ridiculous” that lenders felt unable to help their retail customers with advice on how to invest their savings. “For people with £5,000 or £10,000, there is almost no help out there,” he said.
Financial advisers have a golden opportunity to help the next generation make good financial decisions, says Jason Butler
Robo-advice is a way for banks to deliver investment help more cheaply than through training hundreds of staff. It should also attract more customers who are increasingly turning to online and mobile devices for banking.
But many of the banks will only be recommending their own products, rather than offering a selection of investments from across the market.
Banks are now waiting for the outcome of a review by the Financial Conduct Authority and Treasury on investment advice before finalising their plans, as well as further clarity on pensions and tax changes, according to one senior banker.
The review, which is set to come out before the Budget in March, is focused on how to address the advice gap for consumers, and how financial services groups can tackle the issue.
In another move, some banks are returning to the investment advice market with new teams of dedicated staff.
HSBC is preparing to unveil a division of investment advisers for all customers, including those with less than £50,000 to invest. Santander UK is also rolling out 225 investment advisers in branches across the country by the end of March.

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2 commenti:

Anonimo ha detto...

Un nuovo Robin Hood...al contrario, rubare ai pezzenti per dare ai ricchi!

Anonimo ha detto...

Doctor questa cosa di FintechLab mi interessa... professionalmente ;)
DeeJay